The Perfect Summer Jacket – Canali Kei Blazers

Señores!

It’s hot!

Like, so hot that the devil had to take a day off!

Nonetheless, me espero (I hope) that you are enjoying your summer!

Travel, fun, & sun is what it’s all about.

But if you live in a climate like mine, verano (summer) can wreak havoc on your wardrobe.

Sweaty back, armpit stains, and  a wet chest will ruin an outfit. The ladies don’t like it and it can really hurt a gent’s confidence.

So how do you stay cool, yet remain stylish, during the warm summer days/nights…especially when wearing a blazer? After all, it is a staple in a man’s wardrobe.

1.  It’s All About the Quality

When shopping for a dope blazer/jacket, you want to focus on the quality of the brand. FullSizeRender (7)Quality is not always synonymous with price but the amount that you paga (pay) can be an indicator. Since 1934, Canali has been creating timeless and superbly crafted menswear pieces that are worth every penny. Canali has pieces that fit into any aesthetic and wardrobe.

When making a determination of quality, you want to look at details such as thread count, button types (horn not plastic), stitching, and weight of the fabric. Your jacket should not be shinny, frilling, or pill.

2. It’s All About the Fabric

You’ve heard me say it time and time again that fabric is what makes or breaks an item of clothing. The construction, design, and fit are secondary to the type of textile that being used. The most breathable fabrics are

  • Linen – coolest of all clothing fabrics. Lightweight and doesn’t hold moisture. Wrinkles easily and keeps the wrinkles.
  • Cotton – breathable & holds moisture; most durable and versatile textile.
  • Linen/cotton blend
  • Chambray – durable, durable, durable! Can be hot but the gauge of the fabric can determine how much heat is retained
  • Synthetic dry fit textiles – moisture wicking. This means that the fabric will pull the sweat away from the body and keeps the muggy feeling at bay. Most jerseys and athletic wear are made from this material

3. Construction is Key

For purposes of this article, construccion simply defined. It’s how the jacket is made. In blazers the construction comes in three different forms.

When a jacket is made, it has an interlining that’s known as a canvas. This interlining is usualmente made from horsehair or a horehair combined with cotton or a sythetic material. It’s found between the outer layer of the jacket and the lining. Canali Craftsmanship

It’s purpose is to help the chaqueta  to drape smoothly over the chest. The canvass gives additional support which will allow the garment to be worn properly and fall over the chest and shoulders with ease and style.

The two warm weather constructions are:

Unconstructed

These jackets are unlined and do not have the canvas in them except in the sleeve. Additionally, unconstructed jackets don’t have any roping and have common features such asUnconctructed DB

  • exposed seams
  • working cuffs
  • patch pockets

The major fabric is the outer layer. You will find these in linen, 100% cotton,and cotton blend jackets. The lack of lining allows the jacket to vent well and remains breathable.

I am especially fond of the Kei Jacket. It’s an  icon of Canali blazers and features a soft silhouette for a relaxed and refined look. It’s lightweight construction and varied colorways offer a great selection that every gent should have in their closet. 

FullSizeRender (3)When sporting this type of jacket, they are best worn with casual outfits. Pair them with some jeans and chinos. If you’re really feeling frisky, you can add some simple silhouette sneakers that will give the entire look an edge.

Half Canvas
The canvas in the lining is found throughout the top half of the jacket. This allows for a Half Canvas well-shaped shoulder structure – a very important part of a well-fitting jacket, and ensures the jacket tapers towards the waist. It’s important to remember that a half canvas jacket does have some layering but there are plenty of areas where ventilation can happen. Half Canvas jackets do not lay as flat and  do not move as much as a full canvas construction but are the most popular because they still look sturdy and are very comfortable. They are also, generalmente speaking, less expensive than full canvas pieces.

Generally, you would pair a half canvas jacket with trousers or chinos. They can, however, look great with well fitting pair of jeans.

Keep these facts in mind when searching for the perfect summer blazer or summer suit.

**Editor’s Picks

If you’re reading this blog, then you know that when it comes to style,  I am a fan of the non-traditional and lover of printed fabrics. I really don’t believe in looking like the next gent. There is an intelligent way to break the style rules or have a differentiated look that everyone else.  Canali has a Seersucker Line Seer - Jacketthat does it for me! The lightweight, fresh, and breathable details of the line are remarkable thanks to its characteristic puckering. Seersucker is the perfect fabric for blazers and casual pants for warm weather seasons.Seer - Trousers The microcheck print is different in that the blue is closer to a navy than a cobalt – which is what you would find in a traditional seersucker pattern. Additionally, the line has complete navy options and a collarless water resistant jacket for those pesky evening yacht parties in Miami harbor. The line allows you to mix and match different components seamlessly.

I also fell in love with their footwear. More especificamente, Canali’s sneakers are timeless. The simple design and rich colors allow them to be worn with casual or sporty looks. For the perfect summer chic look, the style savvy gent would team the sneakers with the Seersucker Line, a white shirt (oxford or tee), a bold pocket square, and a well made straw fedora for flare! You would be the talk of the harbor!!

Canali Sneakers

Remember, stay fly my friends!!!!!! It’s easy to do so in Canali!

-SG

This post is sponsored by Canali

 

 

 

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